Three Poems at Yellow Chair Review

Yellow Chair Review’s new issue is up, with three of my poems included. Read, “Coyote,” “Cleaving,” and “Timothy” by clicking right here.

Also, please read an excellent little piece that just embodies the art of saying it between the lines by checking out “Reel Mower” by Timothy DeLizza. I had just moved this poem into the “Yes” folder for Word Fountain’s winter issue when Timothy contacted me to let me know that it was already snatched up by Yellow Chair Review! So now I guess I can’t complain. It’s good to be in great company!

Check out the whole issue of Yellow Chair Review here.

“Fabric” by Bruce Snider

poet-brian-dean-powersI do not know how I missed this in May, but this was shared by my friend Brian Dean Powers when he was guest blogging on Words for the Year. I somehow came across this today and it is, I think, one of the most powerful poems I’ve ever read. And so, I wanted to share it again here.

Thank you, Brian and Christina.

The title of the poem is “Fabric.”

What the lawyers didn’t say
was that neither of you
had a choice once you saw how small
he was, once you heard his narrow
shoulders speak to you about the frail
architecture of his rib cage,
about the delicate, finely scooped bowl
of his skull, about how in this life
there are so few chances
to dominate another man,

Continue Reading: “Fabric” by Bruce Snider

Where the Pickle Confuses, Celebrating Shel Silverstein

From my collection.

From my collection.

I have been rearranging the living room, and in the process of organizing the shelves discovered that I seem to be missing a few books by birthday boy, Shel Silverstein. Hopefully, they are at my boys’ house.  You may not be aware that Lafcadio, the Lion Who Shot Back, was his first children’s story, published in 1963. It was a gift to me after my coming out, from a dear and intimate friend, a reminder that others, on all sides of the sexuality spectrum, would try to shape me into what they saw me as, an identity created by them to match their own stories. I think he wanted me to be aware of the danger, and to encourage me to continue to be brave, to write my own character, my own story, my own life.

Despite the enormous influence he’s had in our family’s reading time, and my own autonomy, I haven’t  recorded much of his work. It’s hard to compete with his many recordings, his playful voice and guitar.  But in celebration of his birthday this September 25th, here are a few videos for the occasion. Continue reading