Submissions Open!

Word Fountain CoverI have been lucky to work for more than two years for a place that allowed me to edit their literary magazine. That’s right, allowed, as in they paid me. Granted, I still had to get all my library work done too, but it was assumed that I would work on the magazine while on the job. Holy cow! For a while, I was paid for my poetry—at last!

Tomorrow I start a new adventure, as the director of another library in the system, a few miles upstream, but I’ll continue to help to edit Word Fountain as a volunteer editor for as long as they can, or until they don’t need me anymore. And who knows, there may be more literary adventures with the new library. The board seemed very interested in what we did with WF.

In the meantime, this beautiful baby that we brought back from hiatus in 2016 will continue! I can’t wait to see what Ainslee has in store for the cover art this time. You can check out current and past issues at WordFountain.net. And follow the link below to send your poetry and short fiction for consideration for the Spring/Summer 2018 edition.

As of January 15th, we have begun reading your submissions of poetry and short-short fiction (1500 words) for our Spring/Summer 2018 issue. Please continue reading this page for the complete guidelines for sending your work to us!

We invite emerging and established writers to send us their previously unpublished stories, poems, flash fiction, and mixed genre work. We prefer very short pieces as we seek to pack quality and variety into 40 to 60 pages. We’re looking for concise writing with a strong, human voice.

Read the guidelines. They’re pretty straightforward and simple: Submissions

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The Chapbooks Are Here!

Poetry Chapbook Moons, Roads, and Rivers by David J. Bauman. Cover, midnight blue looking up through trees with moonlight. books, desk, mac, laptop, micraphone
Ready to sign and record!

Finally, my author copies of Moons, Roads, and Rivers have arrived! The press was running behind, and the holidays slowed things down even more, but here the little lovelies are and I’m very happy with them.

Since my batch came straight from the printer, the preorder copies will be a few days yet before they arrive at your doors. Thank you! If you haven’t ordered yet, you can by visiting Finishing Line Press’s site, or by contacting your favorite, hopefully, indie bookstore.

I say all of this because several people have contacted me saying that they are worried that their order got lost. Probably not. Just a very overwhelmed press with a release time too close to the holidays. From what they are saying, it might be until the 16th before some of you have your copies. I am so very sorry about that.

If you don’t have yours by the 17th of January, please email them directly at MissingBookOrders@finishinglinepress.com. Tell them you ordered Moons, Roads, and Rivers by David J. Bauman, and be sure to mention your correct shipping address. They will have someone look into this email daily in case of missing orders.

Cover image of poetry chapbook Moons, Roads, and Rivers by David J. Bauman. Dark trees, midnight blue and moonlight white lettering serif font
Cover by Michael B. McFarland

If you are new here and haven’t been subject to my incessant self-promotion, Moons, Roads, and Rivers is my first chapbook. It’s a collection of both old and newer poems. Over the years I’ve spent a lot of time on the road and a fair amount of time on, in, or by the river. I grew up along the West Branch of the Susquehanna and now live on the far North Branch. In between, I lived where the two branches meet. But the poems also recall college days in the flatlands of Indiana as well as the wooded hills of central Pennsylvania.

I was divorced from my sons’ mother for most of their lives, so I’ve racked up a lot of driving poems, and since much of that driving was at night, the moon showed up frequently in those pieces. It seemed like a good idea to combine these works and see how they might come together in a small collection, and I think I’m very happy with the result.

Title page of Moons, Roads,, and Rivers by David J. BaumanMostly, I think these are mood and memory pieces. From childhood to fatherhood, it’s the feelings evoked by those travels, those surroundings that permeate these poems, more than any particular “message.”

I hope you enjoy them and order a copy of the chapbook for yourself. I’ll be sharing some information about upcoming readings (You can also check my Events page) and, of course, as is my habit, I’ll be recording a few on SoundCloud and Youtube soon!

 

Janet Locke, Two Poems

These are the last poems from Word Fountain’s recent print issue to be added to their webpage. It was an honor to record Janet Locke’s poem, “Attention,” especially since she told us, after it went to print, that the friend she speaks of in the poem was my beloved Shakespeare professor Doctor Ervene Gulley. I had no idea that impeccably prepared and seemingly perfect woman had a reputation among friends for being late.

This seems a good time to bow in appreciation for the mentors and teachers we have lost. Please follow the link below to hear the reading.

Happy 2018 to you. May your year be full of serendipitous discoveries.

Word Fountain

Attention
Janet Locke

The microwave clock
tells me I’m running late,
even though it runs slow.

So also say my cell phone,
my watch, and my wall clock.

A good friend was late for
everything, and she was perfect

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Moons, Roads, and Rivers

Bauman_David_COV4
Cover photo by Michael B. McFarland

UPDATE:

Moons, Roads, and Rivers, my first chapbook, is about to be released from Finishing Line Press. Click here to order your copy!

The printer is running a few weeks behind, but it looks like any pre-orders should arrive by Christmas or the New Year at the latest.

Moons, Roads, and Rivers is a small collection of poems set along highways and side roads from Pennsylvania to Indiana, from backyards and bar stools to graveyards and broken-down cars. Continue reading “Moons, Roads, and Rivers”

A Barred Owl by Richard Wilbur

Came home after a ridiculously long Monday to microwave my dinner and listen to my youngest son read “Who cooks for you?”

This Richard Wilbur poem is good for the soul too.

*Be sure to click on the link in his screen name to hear Micah read the poem!

The Monkey Prodigy

Please take a moment to relax, close your eyes, and listen to a reading of a fine poem. Okay, you don’t have to close your eyes.

A Barred Owl

By Richard Wilbur

The warping night air having brought the boom
Of an owl’s voice into her darkened room,
We tell the wakened child that all she heard
Was an odd question from a forest bird,
Asking of us, if rightly listened to,
“Who cooks for you?” and then “Who cooks for you?”

Words, which can make our terrors bravely clear,
Can also thus domesticate a fear,
And send a small child back to sleep at night
Not listening for the sound of stealthy flight
Or dreaming of some small thing in a claw
Borne up to some dark branch and eaten raw.

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Requests for Toy Piano by Tony Hoagland

There are so many updates to do. My recent reading in New York City, camping, and hawk watching with my boys—heck I haven’t even told you yet about the poetry conference in Paterson, NJ this summer!

But we’ll get to all of that. At least you know there are things to say, and I know there is more to come. Meanwhile, my youngest son is back at his recording gig, reading poems out loud more frequently than I have been doing lately. In fact, in this post, he has a recording of himself as well as a recording of a young lady at Poetry Out Loud competition reading this particular poem.

I think they are both fine interpretations. I’ve heard others that were too dramatic. Yes, there is such a thing as too dramatic in poetry readings. Generally, I find it best to strike a more even tone. Not monotone by any means. But if you add too many sighs and lilts of voice, too much of anything that isn’t clearly already on the page, you risk limiting the dynamic range of what was written. I realize I am biased, but I think Micah’s reading here is a good example of the less-is-more principle. It expresses just enough emotion to show that it’s human language but allows the poem to do its work without getting in the way by over-presentation.

In this reblogged form, you have to click below where it says “view original post” (or here) to hear Micah’s version.

The Monkey Prodigy

Read this poem by clicking here.

There are several good readings like the one below. A few of them are from the Poetry Out Loud competition which introduced me to this poem.

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